Thursday, October 17, 2013

How to replace a color in a PNG with python preserving transparency

Here is a small bit of code I thought I'd share with you, since I couldn't find a good solution on the web quickly...

I was coding up a web site with a horizontal navigation menu that used a downwards pointing arrow to denote a menu entry that has a drop down menu. The graphics designer had given me the image for this arrow. Here it is enlarged in a GIMP window:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/8112069/darenatwork/2010.10.17_arrow_white.png

Which is all fine and dandy, except, when the mouse hovers above the menu item, the arrow should turn cyan. #00aeef.

I was just about to ask the designer for the cyan version of the arrow, after failing to find a quick and easy way to change all the white pixels to cyan preserving transparency, when I decided to see how hard that would be to do with the Python Imaging Library (PIL).

This is the throwaway script I came up with:

OLD_PATH = r'c:\path\to\images\arrow_white.png'
NEW_PATH = r'c:\path\to\images\arrow_cyan.png'

R_OLD, G_OLD, B_OLD = (255, 255, 255)
R_NEW, G_NEW, B_NEW = (0, 174, 239)

import Image
im = Image.open(OLD_PATH)
pixels = im.load()

width, height = im.size
for x in range(width):
    for y in range(height):
        r, g, b, a = pixels[x, y]
        if (r, g, b) == (R_OLD, G_OLD, B_OLD):
            pixels[x, y] = (R_NEW, G_NEW, B_NEW, a)
im.save(NEW_PATH)

As you can see, that was not so difficult at all... And produced this result:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/8112069/darenatwork/2010.10.17_arrow_cyan.png

Let's just go through this quickly... OLD_PATH and NEW_PATH should be self explaining.

Next, I configure the R(ed), G(reen) and B(lue) values of the color I'm looking for and the color I want to change that to. White is easy, you should be able to do that in your head, but for the cyan bit, the python interpreter can help us:

>>> int('00', 16)
0
>>> int('ae', 16)
174
>>> int('ef', 16)
239
>>>

Converting bytes from hex to decimal is equivalent to parsing the hex string as an int with base 16. The other way round is even easier:

>>> hex(0)
'0x0'
>>> hex(174)
'0xae'
>>> hex(239)
'0xef'
>>>

Next, I import the imaging library and open the image. The load() method returns a map of the image, which each x,y-coordinate denoting a tuple (r, g, b, a) with a being the alpha channel or transparency.

The rest of the script is therefor just a simple iteration over the width and height of the image, pixel by pixel, testing for the old color and replacing that with the new color if found, preserving the original transparency.

Thursday, May 30, 2013

New Feature: StartupScript in RevitPythonShell

Here is a new hidden feature in recent versions of the RevitPythonShell: You can specify a script to start when Revit starts. The script is called during the IExternalApplication.OnStartup event when all the Revit plugins get to do their initialization.

This feature is still not quite official yet, but I have been using it for various purposes internally and think it works quite nicely. There are some changes between the code I have locally and what you probably have installed - I will point these out below.

To specify a StartupScript for RevitPythonShell, add a tag called StartupScript to the RevitPythonShell.xml file at the same level as the Commands, Variables, SearchPaths and InitScript tags. This tag has a single attribute src that specifies the path to the script to run.

You can find the RevitPythonShell.xml file in the folder %APPDATA%\RevitPythonShell2013.

This feature is also present in deployed RpsAddins!

Example:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<RevitPythonShell>
  <StartupScript src="c:\path-to-your-script\your-awesome-startup-script.py"/>
  <Commands>
    <Command name="Hello World" src="C:\...\helloworld.py" group="Examples"/>
    <!-- ... -->

NOTE:

If you are not building from source, then the attribute to use in the StartupScript tag is still source. I changed it to src for consistency with the Command tag. Future versions of RevitPythonShell (especially the 2014 line) will use src as described in this post!

There is currently no GUI for changing the StartupScript. Also, this is somewhat of a specialist feature: You probably don't want to use it except for some very special cases.

So... what can you do with a startup script? So far, I have used it for two projects...

In the first project, I load a web server and hook it up to the Idling event so that I can provide an HTTP interface to Revit. My day job involves extracting an abstract model of simulation relevant aspects of a building from Revit, much like gbXML and being able to do that from outside Revit gives me some flexibility.

In the second project, I was automating a solar study: For each window in an elaborate model, I traced rays from a grid on the window to the sun from the SunAndShadowSettings to determine the percentage of direct sunlight a window gets - for every 15 minutes in a whole year! Since the model was big, with a lot of neighboring buildings modeled as mass objects, ray tracing (using the FindReferencesByDirectionWithContext method) gets very slow. Simulating a single day takes about 20 minutes. And simulating the whole year just broke down with Revit crashing. So... I decided to do each day separatly, and just start Revit after each day - the startup script would check the __vars__[START_DAY] variable to get the current day to simulate and on successful simulation, increment that day (this is where the writeable __vars__ feature was born) and quit Revit. Then I wrapped that up in a simple script that just started looped 365 times, starting Revit and waiting for it to finish.

Side note: quitting Revit is not that easy. Or really easy, whichever way you want to view it. I ended up using this code to force the process to die:

from System.Diagnostics import Process
p = Process.GetCurrentProcess()
p.Kill()

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

__vars__ is now writeable

Here is another feature I sneaked in without documentation: The __vars__ dictionary is now writeable, that is, assigning to a key in the dictionary saves the variable to the RevitPythonShell.xml file.

This feature can be used for storing data in between invocations of a script or even Revit sessions!

NOTE:

Changing the RevitPythonShell.xml file manually will not be reflected in the __vars__ dictionary until the next invocation of the shell.

The implementation for the writeable dictionary is in RevitPythonShell.RpsRuntime.SettingsDictionary, which implements IDictionary<string, string>.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml.Linq;

namespace RevitPythonShell.RpsRuntime
{
    /// <summary>
    /// A subclass of Dictionary<string, string>, that writes changes back to a settings xml file.
    /// </summary>
    public class SettingsDictionary : IDictionary<string, string>
    {
        private readonly IDictionary<string, string> _dict;
        private readonly string _settingsPath;
        private XDocument _settings;

        public SettingsDictionary(string settingsPath)
        {
            _settingsPath = settingsPath;
            _settings = XDocument.Load(_settingsPath);

            _dict = _settings.Root.Descendants("StringVariable").ToDictionary(
                v => v.Attribute("name").Value,
                v => v.Attribute("value").Value);
        }

        private void SetVariable(string name, string value)
        {
            var variable = _settings.Root.Descendants("StringVariable").Where(x => x.Attribute("name").Value == name).FirstOrDefault();
            if (variable != null)
            {
                variable.Attribute("value").Value = value.ToString();
            }
            else
            {
                _settings.Root.Descendants("Variables").First().Add(
                    new XElement("StringVariable", new XAttribute("name", name), new XAttribute("value", value)));
            }
            _settings.Save(_settingsPath);
        }

        private void RemoveVariable(string name)
        {
            var variable = _settings.Root.Descendants("StringVariable").Where(x => x.Attribute("name").Value == name).FirstOrDefault();
            if (variable != null)
            {
                variable.Remove();
                _settings.Save(_settingsPath);
            }
        }

        private void ClearVariables()
        {
            var variables = _settings.Root.Descendants("StringVariable");
            foreach (var variable in variables)
            {
                variable.Remove();
            }
            _settings.Save(_settingsPath);
        }

        public void Add(string key, string value)
        {
            _dict.Add(key, value);
            SetVariable(key, value);
        }

        public bool ContainsKey(string key)
        {
            return _dict.ContainsKey(key);
        }

        public ICollection<string> Keys
        {
            get { return _dict.Keys; }
        }

        public bool Remove(string key)
        {
            RemoveVariable(key);
            return _dict.Remove(key);
        }

        public bool TryGetValue(string key, out string value)
        {
            return _dict.TryGetValue(key, out value);
        }

        public ICollection<string> Values
        {
            get { return _dict.Values; }
        }

        public string this[string key]
        {
            get
            {
                return _dict[key];
            }
            set
            {
                _dict[key] = value;
                SetVariable(key, value);
            }
        }

        public void Add(KeyValuePair<string, string> item)
        {
            _dict.Add(item);
            SetVariable(item.Key, item.Value);
        }

        public void Clear()
        {
            ClearVariables();
            _dict.Clear();
        }

        public bool Contains(KeyValuePair<string, string> item)
        {
            return _dict.Contains(item);
        }

        public void CopyTo(KeyValuePair<string, string>[] array, int arrayIndex)
        {
            _dict.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
        }

        public int Count
        {
            get { return _dict.Count; }
        }

        public bool IsReadOnly
        {
            get { return false; }
        }

        public bool Remove(KeyValuePair<string, string> item)
        {
            RemoveVariable(item.Key);
            return _dict.Remove(item);
        }

        public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<string, string>> GetEnumerator()
        {
            return _dict.GetEnumerator();
        }

        System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return _dict.GetEnumerator();
        }
    }
}

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Deploying RPS scripts with DeployRpsAddin

I know nobody is checking the code I check into the RevitPythonShell code repository, because nobody bothered to ask me about the new killer feature i sneaked in. For a project at work that I used the RevitPythonShell for, the need arose to deploy a bunch of scripts on a customers computer. Now, RPS itself has a simple installer that you can execute and go next, next, next, finish and voilĂ , you have RPS installed on your computer. But... any scripts you write need to be copied to the customers computer, then RPS has to be installed and configured to pick up the script. Oh, and don't forget to install cpython and any modules you make use of.

Have you tried writing instructions for such a manual installation procedure? I have. It is not fun at all! I have also tried to get people to execute these instructions. It just doesn't fly.

This is where the new feature of RPS comes in: In the Ribbon, there is now an additional button called "Deploy RpsAddin" that is located under the button for starting the shell, just above the one for customizing RPS.

Deploying an RPS script as a standalone addin involves choosing an xml file that acts as a manifest or package description of the addin you are about to create. Basically, you describe which python scripts to assign to which buttons and it creates a new dll for you that includes all these scripts and can be used as an addin in Revit. You just need to write an addin manifest and place it in the right position.

The source comes with an example addin called HelloWorld. That really is all it does: a Button that prints "Hello, World!" to the screen. But I include the xml deployment file and also an InnoSetup script to get you started on deploying your own addins.

When you want to include a cpython library, you will need to make sure that this is also in the search path of the addin's bundled interpreter. So, the addin includes a bunch of files, dlls, a version of IronPython (2.7) and also the new RpsRuntime dll that handles the parts of RPS that get used by both the standard RPS version and deployed addins.

You can include cpython modules in your setup program, copying them for instance into your installation directory and then go from there. There is an equivalent of the RevitPythonShell2013.xml file that gets deployed with your addin to the %AppData% folder that you can use for setting up stuff.

The structure of the deployment xml file looks like this: (I will call it RpsAddin xml file from now on)

<?xml version=" 1.0" encoding=" utf-8" ?>
<RpsAddin>
  <RibbonPanel text=" Hello World">
    <!-- the script is always searched relative to the location of the RpsAddin xml file -->
    < PushButton text ="Hello World! " script ="helloworld.py "/>
  </RibbonPanel>
</RpsAddin>

You can add as many RibbonPanel tags as you would like. Each PushButton is then placed on that panel and assigned to the script. The path to the script is relative to the RpsAddin xml file. The DLL that gets created is placed in a folder "Output_YOUR_RPSADDIN_NAME" relative to the RpsAddin xml. The name of your addin is taken from the name you call the RpsAddin xml file. In this case, the file is called "HelloWorld.xml", so the Addin will be called "HelloWorld", a folder "Output_HelloWorld" is created with the dll "HelloWorld.dll", "RpsRuntime.dll" and a bunch of IronPython dlls.

You can then use an InnoSetup file to create an installer for this. The HelloWorld example comes with this file:

[Files]
Source: Output_HelloWorld\RpsRuntime.dll; DestDir: {app};
Source: Output_HelloWorld\IronPython.dll; DestDir: {app};
Source: Output_HelloWorld\IronPython.Modules.dll; DestDir: {app};
Source: Output_HelloWorld\Microsoft.Scripting.Metadata.dll; DestDir: {app};
Source: Output_HelloWorld\Microsoft.Dynamic.dll; DestDir: {app};
Source: Output_HelloWorld\Microsoft.Scripting.dll; DestDir: {app};

; this is the main dll with the script embedded
Source: Output_HelloWorld\HelloWorld.dll; DestDir: {app};

; add a similar line, if your addin requires a configuration file (search paths or predefined variables)
;Source: HelloWorld.xml; DestDir: {userappdata}\HelloWorld; Flags: onlyifdoesntexist;

[code]
{ install revit manifest file }
procedure CurStepChanged(CurStep: TSetupStep);
var
  AddInFilePath: String;
  AddInFileContents: String;
begin

  if CurStep = ssPostInstall then
  begin

  { GET LOCATION OF USER AppData (Roaming) }
  AddInFilePath := ExpandConstant('{userappdata}\Autodesk\Revit\Addins\2013\HelloWorld.addin');

  { CREATE NEW ADDIN FILE }
  AddInFileContents := '<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" standalone="no"?>' + #13#10;
  AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '<RevitAddIns>' + #13#10;
  AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '  <AddIn Type="Application">' + #13#10;
    AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '    <Name>HelloWorld</Name>' + #13#10;
  AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '    <Assembly>'  + ExpandConstant('{app}') + '\HelloWorld.dll</Assembly>' + #13#10;

  { NOTE: create your own GUID here!!! }
  AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '    <AddInId>276D41F2-CCC4-4B55-AF2A-47D30227F289</AddInId>' + #13#10;

  AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '    <FullClassName>HelloWorld</FullClassName>' + #13#10;

  { NOTE: you should register your own VendorId with Autodesk }
  AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '  <VendorId>RIPS</VendorId>' + #13#10;
  AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '  </AddIn>' + #13#10;
  AddInFileContents := AddInFileContents + '</RevitAddIns>' + #13#10;
  SaveStringToFile(AddInFilePath, AddInFileContents, False);

  end;
end;

{ uninstall revit addin manifest }
procedure CurUninstallStepChanged(CurUninstallStep: TUninstallStep);
var
  AddInFilePath: String;
begin
  if CurUninstallStep = usPostUninstall then
  begin
    AddInFilePath := ExpandConstant('{userappdata}\Autodesk\Revit\Addins\2013\HelloWorld.addin');

    if FileExists(AddInFilePath) then
    begin
      DeleteFile(AddInFilePath);
    end;
  end;
end;


[Setup]
AppName=HelloWorld
AppVerName=HelloWorld
RestartIfNeededByRun=false
DefaultDirName={pf32}\HelloWorld
OutputBaseFilename=Setup_HelloWorld
ShowLanguageDialog=auto
FlatComponentsList=false
UninstallFilesDir={app}\Uninstall
UninstallDisplayName=HelloWorld
AppVersion=2012.0
VersionInfoVersion=2012.0
VersionInfoDescription=HelloWorld
VersionInfoTextVersion=HelloWorld

I included some Pascal code for installing an addin manifest to the %APPDATA% folder. This is generally something like C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\ADDIN_NAME. Running this setup will produce a file called Setup_Helloworld.exe that can then be given to your friends to try out your new cool HelloWorld Revit Addin, coded in the sweet python language we all love so much!

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Everyone vs. Just Me for Custom Actions Installer Classes

This post explains how to change the behavior of your Custom Actions Installer class depending on the user choice in the dialog box:

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/8112069/darenatwork/2013.01.16_JustMeEveryone.png

The Problem

When you create a Custom Action project to be called from a Visual Studio 2010 Setup project, you subclass System.Configuration.Install.Installer. This will then be called from the Visual Studio 2010 Setup project, passing in some context information about the installation via the Context.Parameters StringDictionary.

Except it doesn't contain the information about wether the user chose "Just Me" or "Everyone"!

The Solution

I came across this page that explained how to pass in information to Context.Parameters in the custom action: You can use the CustomActionData property to add values to Context.Parameters.

The trick is, to use the format "/varname=value", and variable substitution happens for Windows Installer Properties, if they are enclosed in square brackets...

After googling a bit more, I found a msdn page containing the Windows Installer Property Reference and searching that, I found the property ALLUSERS. This is set to the string "1" if the user chose to install for "Everyone" and set to the empty string "" if the user chose to install for "Just Me".

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/8112069/darenatwork/2013.01.16_CustomActionData.png

Putting two and two together, I added the string "/allusers=[ALLUSERS]" to the CustomActionData property for the custom actions. And then can query this inside the Installer class:

if (Context.Parameters["allusers"] == "1")
{
    // user selected "Everyone"
}
else
{
    // user selected "Just Me"
}

Testing this proved that the ALLUSERS property is retained by the Windows Installer and can also be used for uninstalling.

Context: Installing Revit Addins

When installing addins for the Autodesk Revit product, a manifest file has to be created and placed in a specific directory. There are two addin directories to choose from: One for the current user and one for all users of the system.

The RevitPythonShell installer for Revit 2013 has been updated with the above technique to install to different locations based on the users choice. You can see a working example of what the custom action code looks like in the RevitPythonShell source for the RegisterAddinCustomAction class.

Friday, October 5, 2012

RPS script to print a list of floor types and their functions

Yesterday, I needed to print out all the floor types in a Revit document along with their function (Interior/Exterior). Obviously, I decided to write a quick RevitPythonShell script, but ran into some snags along the way that I would like to share.

This should really be as easy as:

collector = FilteredElementCollector(doc)
for floor_type in collector.OfClass(FloorType):
   print floor_type.Name, floor_type.Function

But, well, nothing is ever easy, is it? What I ended up doing was this:

from System import Enum
collector = FilteredElementCollector(doc)
collector.OfClass(FloorType)
for floor_type in collector:
   name = Element.Name.GetValue(floor_type)
   function_param = Element.get_Parameter(floor_type, BuiltInParameter.FUNCTION_PARAM)
   if function_param:
      function = Enum.ToObject(WallFunction, function_param.AsInteger()).ToString()
   else:
      function = 'None'
   print '%(name)-25s\t%(function)s' % locals()

Let's go through this line by line...

from System import Enum

Uh... I'll explain that later on...

collector = FilteredElementCollector(doc)
collector.OfClass(FloorType)
for floor_type in collector:

Nothing unusual here - this is how to get a list of elements from a Revit document using a FilteredElementCollector and iterating over that list.

name = Element.Name.GetValue(floor_type)

What?! Shouldn't that just have been floor_type.Name? I thought so too. But somehow, whenever I do that, I get an error like this:

>>> # note how ugly one-liners get ;)
>>> ft = list(FilteredElementCollector(doc).OfClass(FloorType))[0].Name
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: Name

This AttributeError is somehow related to IronPython not being able to figure out that it needs to use the base method inherited from Autodesk.Revit.DB.Element. So, I tell it to use that explicitly by referencing the property explicitly with Element.Name - and then retrieving its value: .GetValue. It needs to be told for which instance to retrieve the value, which is why I then plug in the floor_type object.

So... now we have the name of the FloorType. What about its function? That isn't a property, but rather a parameter, that can be found using the Revit Lookup tool: BuiltInParameter.FUNCTION_PARAM. Retrieving parameters is easy:

function_param = Element.get_Parameter(floor_type, BuiltInParameter.FUNCTION_PARAM)

Note again, how I use the base method Element.get_Parameter, as it doesn't seem to work on FloorType directly - my guess is that the definition of FloorType somehow isn't what IronPython is used to...

 if function_param:
       function = Enum.ToObject(WallFunction, function_param.AsInteger()).ToString()
else:
   function = 'None'

The parameter may be null or, in python None, which will evaluate to False in a condition. In that case, we just set the text of the variable function to 'None'`. But the other line is a lot more interesting! This is why we did the from System import Enum earlier on: The (integer) value of the FUNCTION_PARAM is actually a member of an enumeration. As far as I can tell, it is equivalent to the WallFunction enumeration. With Enum.ToObject(WallFunction, function_param.AsInteger()), we can an the appropriate instance of this enumeration, which we then convert to a string (ToString()).

The last line:

print '%(name)-25s\t%(function)s' % locals()

Prints out the name and function nicely, using pythons string formatting: Left-alined name with a minimum width of 25 characters, a tab and then the function.

Try the script!

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Converting line endings on the cheap

You're at a client's PC, installing some scripts and need to edit a text file. Of course your client has no real editor, just that stupid notepad.exe! And then you notice: All the line endings are wrong, that is, they're LF (unix convention) as opposed to CR-LF (dos convention). That is because you do have a real editor, and so does the other guy working on that file and one of you was not working on windows, because it's only an OS, right? A tool, not a religion.

Not religous either: What escapes your mouth when you are confronted with a single line of script and black box characters laughing at you where line breaks should be.

Now, users of cygwin are probably familiar with a myriad of tools (e.g. dos2unix.exe) to convert from dos line endings to unix line endings. You might be able to get tr to work for you too. Or you could just open the file in your trusty real editor and type away.

But your client has none of this installed.

What your client does have installed, is MS Word. Seriously. I'm going to use MS Word now. This is how:

  1. open the script/text file in notepad
  2. select all text, copy it to the clipboard ([CTRL]+[A], [CTRL]+[C])
  3. open a blank document in MS Word
  4. paste from the clipboard ([CTRL]+[V])
  5. select all text in MS Word, copy it to the clipboard ([CTRL]+[A], [CTRL]+[C])
  6. paste over (replacing) the selection in notepad ([CTRL]+[V])
  7. close MS Word and wash your hands to get rid of the dirty hack feeling...